Scenario 2: An urgent email

Jeena just received an urgent email and needs to decide how to respond. Given her situation, click on the choice you think is best.


The email informs Jeena that her immediate attention is required due to a serious problem with one of her credit card accounts. The message says if she doesn’t act quickly, her account may be closed and her credit record damaged. The email asks her to contact the company immediately about her account by clicking on a link to their Web site. Your immediate attention is needed
Click on the Web link and respond to the questions.

The consequences of your choice

See the consequences of your choice for Jeena and hear what the coach has to say.


Is someone “phishing” for your confidential financial information? “I wish I hadn’t clicked on that link. The Web site looked real, so I entered all my information. But then I called the real company myself and found out the email was a “phishing” scam – which means I gave my financial information to fraudsters! What a mess! In the future, I’ll contact the company myself before I respond to an email that says “Immediate attention required” or “Please contact us immediately.”
Don’t click the link. Call the credit card company directly at the number printed on your card.

The consequences of your choice

See the consequences of your choice for Jeena and hear what the coach has to say.


Is someone “phishing” for your confidential financial information? “I’m so glad I played it safe and didn’t respond to that email. I know that one of the ways criminals commit fraud is by directing people to phony Web sites that look real. So unless I initiated the communication, I don’t respond. Instead, I call the company myself – making sure it’s the real phone number for a real company – to find out what’s really going on.”
Click on the link. Make sure the site looks legitimate. If so, provide the information requested.

The consequences of your choice

See the consequences of your choice for Jeena and hear what the coach has to say.


Is someone “phishing” for your confidential financial information? “I definitely made a mistake. The site looked legitimate, but after I entered my information, I had a bad feeling about it. I called my credit card company and found out the Web site was phony and that email was an example of “phishing.” Now it looks like my identity and some money may have been stolen. It’s going to take me tons of time to resolve this mess!”
Submit
For more information about financial fraud and how to avoid it, click on Library.
Scenario 1: On the telephone Scenario 2: An urgent email